Rejser til Tadsjikistan

I selve hjertet af Asien ligger Tadsjikistan – landet med de forrevne tinder, de isolerede samfund og en historie, der strækker sig over tusinder af år. Det er smukt, og det venter bare på at blive udforsket.

De gamle fæstninger, der går helt tilbage til tider, hvor de var en vigtig del af handelsruten, Silkevejen, er absolut et besøg værd og vover man sig ind i den tadsjikiske side af Wakhan-dalen, kan man se Afghanistan ovre på den anden side af floden Panj, der længere mod vest i Usbekistan løber ud i Amudarya – kaldet Oxus i den græske oldtid.

I Tadsjikistan er der mulighed for at den eventyrlystne besøgende kan bo hjemme hos familier i lokalsamfundene. Det giver en enestående indsigt i kulturen i en af de fjerneste afkroge på jorden.

Her findes nogle af de højeste bjerge i verden, hvor udsigten vil få dig til at gispe højt af betagelse. Tadsjikistan er et land med episke landskaber. Der findes ikke ret mange andre steder i vores verden, der er mere er visuelt imponerende.

Grupperejse 1 ► Tadsjikistan og Kirgisistan - Ad Pamir Highway
Grupperejse 2 ► Usbekistan, Turkmenistan & Tadsjikistan - Silkevejens sjæl

Grupperejse 1 ► Tadsjikistan og Kirgisistan - Ad Pamir Highway

Generel information om grupperejser i Tadsjikistan

Happy Lama Travels eksklusive grupperejser i Tadsjikistan foregår i små internationale grupper med lokal engelsktalende rejseleder. Derfor er rejsebeskrivelserne på engelsk.

En lokal rejseleder kender sit land bedre end en dansk rejseleder. Det er desuden vores erfaring at en lokal rejseleder giver dig et bedre indblik i, hvordan livet leves i Tadsjikistan.

Passer rejsedatoerne dig ikke eller vil du selv have maksimal indflydelse på dit rejseprogram – Kontakt os hvis du ønsker et tilbud på en individuel rejse i Tadsjikistan.

asien@happylamatravel.com

Denne rejse kombinerer Tadsjikistan med Kirgisistan.

Trip Summary

The Pamir Mountains have long been known as ‘the roof of the world’, a region of utterly breathtaking scenery and home to a fascinating melange of cultures. Follow in the footsteps of ancient traders and pilgrims, and Victorian explorers in discovering a region largely isolated from the world beyond, a land where each village speaks its own different dialect and local traditions have been maintained for centuries. Traversing the legendary Pamir Highway, this trip starts in the Tajik capital Dushanbe but quickly leaves the modern world behind as you wind your way along difficult mountain roads and high passes, in the shadow of some of the highest mountains on our planet. We visit ruined forts from the days of the old Silk Road, and pass gem mines mentioned by Marco Polo. Spending many nights in homestays in small communities, we are able to gain a great insight into what it means to live in this harsh but majestic region. From Tajikistan we cross into Kyrgyzstan and the ancient city of Osh, and then head to Chichkan where we can meet local shepherds or hike in the surrounding countryside. We also visit Issyk Kul, the largest lake in Central Asia, and have time to explore Bishkek. This trip ventures to a remote and enchanting land that has remained hidden to the rest of the world, a land of towering peaks, turbulent rivers and fascinating people. Travel with us on one of the most amazing journeys you are ever likely to make.

Fitness***** | Adventure***** | Culture**** | History** | Wildlife*

Day 1 – Dushanbe

Arrive in Dushanbe, the capital of Tajikistan and transfer to your hotel, where if required your room will be available for early check-in. The rest of the day is free to relax or explore. Overnight Hotel Gulistan or similar.

Dushanbe
Dushanbe is a relatively modern town that rose to prominence during the Soviet era, when it was made the capital of the Tajik Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic and named Stalinabad. Its name means ‘Monday in the Tajik language, arising from the fact that this was the day that the market was held when Dushanbe was still a small and fairly insignificant village. The ousted Emir of Bukhara, fleeing from the Bolsheviks, stayed in Dushanbe and cooperated with Enver Pasha’s Basmachis until he had to leave the region. From Dushanbe, he fled to Afghanistan in 1921, the year the town was freed from the Basmachis as well.

Day 2 – Hissar - Dushanbe

Drive to the nearby town of Hissar to visit the remains of the 18th century fort as well as two nearby madrassahs. Return to Dushanbe in the afternoon and visit the bazaar and the excellent Museum of National Antiquities. Overnight Hotel Gulistan or similar. (BL)

Hissar
The history of Hissar fort is colourful, with the fortress the stronghold of local basmachi forces resisting the might of Russia. Through the 1920s a power struggle was played out in the region between Bolshevik forces and Pan-Turkic would-be occupiers under the Ottoman Enver Pasha, who was eventually killed in Tajikistan. Today the fort is largely in ruins although the impressive main gate has been reconstructed. Opposite sit two madrassahs dating back to the 16th century, one of which has a small museum in it.

Day 3 – Kalaikhumb

We set off east towards the Pamirs and Kalaikhumb, driving through beautiful scenery and interesting villages en route. This area is a little more conservative, and we see many men with beards, and women wearing traditional dress. We cross the Khaburabot Pass, arriving in Kalaikhumb (360km) in the early evening. Overnight local guesthouse. Shared bathroom facilities tonight. (BLD)

The Pamir Mountains
Spreading across Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Afghanistan and China the Pamirs are situated at the junction of some of the world’s highest mountain ranges – the Himalayas, the Hindu Kush and the Tian Shan among others, and with peaks exceeding 7000m are known locally as ‘the Roof of the World’. With numerous glaciers and covered in snow throughout the year, the climate here is unforgiving with only a short summer season. Nevertheless the Pamirs are home to both people and wildlife – of the latter notable species include the Marco Polo sheep and snow leopard. Communities and villages in the Pamirs are isolated, separated from each other in valleys and with different villages often speaking different dialects, even though they may not be far from each other as the crow flies. It was in this region that the last stages of the ‘Great Game’ – the territorial rivalry between the empires of Russia and Britain – were played out in the late 19th century, with intrepid adventurers mapping the high passes and staking claims for king and country. The Pamir Highway, running from Dushanbe to Osh, is the second highest in the world (after the Khardung La Pass in the Ladakh region of India).

Days 4-5 – Geisev Valley

Travel to Rushan the administrative centre of the Bartang district. We may have some time to explore upon arrival but we will explore in more depth tomorrow. On Day 5 we drive to the Bartang valley and cross the river by a wagon hanging on a wire rope. We then embark on a trek that begins on the river Bartang just beyond Bhagoo village and is mostly gentle uphill for about 8km to the upper of the three lakes. The first houses in Geisev are reached after about 5km. The abundant vegetation, the gnarled trees, the lakes and the ever-changing river – sometimes frothing with energy, sometimes limpid and blue – create a very special peaceful atmosphere. This route passing lakes and rivers traverses some of the most magnificent scenery in the Pamirs. Overnight at a homestay with shared rooms and bathroom facilities. (BLD)

Day 6 – Khorog

Drive through more superb scenery (97km), alongside the river Panj which forms the border with Afghanistan. We stay in relative luxury tonight, having reached the capital of the Gorno-Badakshan Autonomous Oblast (GBAO). We have a little time to explore Khorog including the bazaar and the lovely Botanical Gardens which are perched high above the town, affording some great panoramic views. Overnight Lal Inn or similar. Shared bathroom facilities. (BLD)

Khorog
The capital of Gorno-Badakshan Autonomous Oblast, Khorog is a small town that at various times has been under the control of the Russia, the Emirate of Bukhara and Afghanistan. The Russians built a fort here in the Soviet era, with Khorog being in a highly strategic location on the border with Afghanistan, but today it languishes and is one of the least developed parts of the country, with the Aga Khan Foundation contributing to the bulk of the local economy. It holds the distinction of being home the second highest botanical garden in the world.

Day 7 – Ishkashim

About 50kms (140km total) along the road to our next stop, Ishkashim, we will stop at Garmchasma hot springs for an (optional) dip in the waters. From here, we enter the Tajik half of the Wakhan Valley (shared with Afghanistan) and pass regional gem mines mentioned by Marco Polo. The most famous mine is Koh-i-Lal ruby mine which is visible from the road. Ishkashim itself may be the regional centre, but it is essentially still a large village and we stay in a traditional style guesthouse here. Shared bathroom facilities this evening (BLD)

Day 8 – Langar

Visit to the nearby village of Namadguti to visit the Khahkha Fortress. This impressive structure rises from a naturally formed platform of rock and dates back to the Kushan era of the 3rd Century. There are a number of these ancient fortresses in the area, and we also visit Yamchun fort, perhaps the most impressive of them. We take a break at the Bibi Fatima hot springs, named for the Prophet Mohammed’s sister and where local women believe they can increase their fertility. Continuing on we then stop at the 4th Century Buddhist stupas at Vrang, reminders of the ancient pilgrim caravans that passed through the region. (130km today) Overnight homestay with shared basic bathroom facilities. Tonight you will sleep on Asian style bedding on the mattresses and blankets on the floor in a few rooms of a Pamiri House (BLD)

Day 9 – Murghab

Leave behind the lush valleys of the Wakhan Valley and enter a landscape that is rocky, mostly barren but nevertheless dramatic. This is the Pamir Highway we have anticipated, with the route between Khorog and Osh completed in 1931 across a Tibetan-plateau style high altitude terrain. With a total of 240kms to cover today, we anticipate arriving in Murghab early evening. Overnight homestay with shared rooms and shared basic bathroom facilities. (BLD)

Day 10 – Karakul

After breakfast we head for Karakul (135km). We cross several high altitude passes, including Ak-Baital Pass (4655 metres) which is the highest section of road in the former Soviet Union. We descend to Karakul Lake and then cross our final Pamir Highway high pass, the Kyzyl Art (4282 metres), which essentially forms the border between Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan. Karakul Lake is the highest lake in Central Asia, and at 3915 metres, too high to support any aquatic life. Karakul means “black lake” but in Spring, summer and autumn the water is almost always turquoise blue. At the northern end of the lake a track turns off west to geoglyphs and Saka graves (5000– 3000 BC), located about 500m from the turnoff. Overnight home stay “Sadat” or similar. Tonight you will sleep on Asian style bedding on the mattresses and blankets on the floor in a few rooms of a Pamiri House (BLD)

Day 11 – Osh

We depart the high mountains of the Pamir Alay range, leaving behind us the crossroads of Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and China. The drive offers a contrast as we encounter lush farmlands and small villages on this side of the mountains, instead of the stark high altitude plateau of Tajikistan. En route we cross the Taldyk Pass (3554m) and enjoy some beautiful views – if we’re lucky we may even catch a glimpse of Peak Lenin, at 7134m the second highest mountain in Central Asia. We expect to arrive in Osh (285km), Kyrgyzstan’s oldest city in the afternoon, with time to explore. Overnight Hotel Pekin or similar. (BL)

Osh
Osh is ancient – various sources date it back around 2500 years, and legends abound over who founded it, including Alexander the Great and King Solomon. On the edge of the Ferghana Valley it is home to both Uzbek and Kyrgyz people, with its position on the border giving rise to an extremely lively market, one of the most interesting in Central Asia. The rock known as Solomon’s Throne is an important place of pilgrimage for Muslims, and a 15th century mosque on the top has now been reconstructed, with excellent views of the surrounding countryside. Osh is also home to the largest mosque in Kyrgyzstan, and is one of the few places in the former Soviet Union still to have a statue of Lenin.

Day 12 – Toktogul

Start the day in the rocky backdrop of the Alay Mountain range just outside Osh. We visit Sulaiman-Too Sacred Mountain which is Kyrgyzstan’s only UNESCO World Heritage Site. It was once an important pilgrimage site in Central Asia and its location in the Fergana Valley meant it was also an important hub along the Silk Road. The mountain houses a hive of places of worship, both ancient and newer. You’ll find ancient petroglyphs along the craggy mountain peaks, and sites dating back to the 16th century, like the two mosques. The mountain is symbolic of Kyrgyzstan’s ancient pagan heritage combined with the contemporary Muslim one. Continue to Toktogul town named after the well-known akyn (Kyrgyz bard) Toktogul Satylganov (1884 – 1933) who was born here. Time permitting we shall spend some time exploring the town. Overnight local guesthouse (BLD)

Day 13 – Song Kol Lake

Today takes us to stunning Song Kol Lake (240km). The lake itself is 3916m above sea level and is one of the highest alpine lakes in the world. Overnight yurt stay. Shared room facilities tonight with 4 – 5 beds in one yurt. (BLD)

Day 14 – Lake Issyk Kul

Travel to Cholpon-Ata on the north side of Issyk-Kul Lake to the largest and most beautiful lake in Central Asia. There is an optional opportunity to visit the open air museum of Stone Inscriptions in Cholpon Ata. Most of the drawings date from several thousand years B.C. up until the 12th Century A.D. Overnight at Amin Hotel or similar (BLD)

Issyk Kul
At 170km long and with a maximum depth of 695 metres, Issyk Kul is the tenth largest lake in the world and with its high levels of salinity never freezes, even in the harshest of winters here. Fed by many rivers, none flow from it contributing to a salt content of around 0.6%. In Soviet times it was a popular spa resort, and ongoing excavations show that there has been settlement around here for 2500 years or so. It is home to a number of different species of fish, many of which can only be found here.

Day 15 – Bishkek

Drive to Bishkek and explore the capital, visiting Ala-Too Square and the History Museum among other sites. Overnight Semetei Hotel or similar. (BL)

Bishkek
Kyrgyzstan’s capital is a modern city, originally founded in 1825 but developed extensively by the USSR and at that time named Frunze after a famous Bolshevik general. With over a million inhabitants it follows the typical Soviet city pattern of wide boulevards and drab apartment blocks, large squares and public parks and before Kyrgyz independence had a majority Russian population, although not now. Although not blessed with the interesting sights of other Central Asian cities, it does have a few things worth visiting – the impressive Ala-Too square, the History Museum and the Orthodox Church, a reminder that not all Russians left in 1991.

Day 16 – Bishkek

Transfer to the airport for your onward flight. (B)

Grupperejse 1 ► Tadsjikistan og Kirgisistan - Ad Pamir Highway
Grupperejse 2 ► Usbekistan, Turkmenistan & Tadsjikistan - Silkevejens sjæl

Grupperejse 2 ► Usbekistan, Turkmenistan & Tadsjikistan - Silkevejens sjæl

Generel information om grupperejser i Tadsjikistan

Happy Lama Travels eksklusive grupperejser i Tadsjikistan foregår i små internationale grupper med lokal engelsktalende rejseleder. Derfor er rejsebeskrivelserne på engelsk.

En lokal rejseleder kender sit land bedre end en dansk rejseleder. Det er desuden vores erfaring at en lokal rejseleder giver dig et bedre indblik i, hvordan livet leves i Tadsjikistan.

Passer rejsedatoerne dig ikke eller vil du selv have maksimal indflydelse på dit rejseprogram – Kontakt os hvis du ønsker et tilbud på en individuel rejse i Tadsjikistan.

asien@happylamatravel.com

Denne rejse kombinerer Tadsjikistan med Usbekistan og Turkmenistan.

Trip Summary

The legendary ‘Silk Road’ occupies a mythical place in the imaginations of western travellers, a remote region in the centre of the Eurasian landmass through which countless traders journeyed on their voyages between Europe and the Far East. As well as commerce, the exchange of ideas and cultures flowed through the various arteries of the Silk Road, resulting in an incredible flowering of architecture, education and religion. Tucked away between the Indian subcontinent and Russia lay the legacies and monuments of numerous civilisations, and a warm and friendly people with intriguing cultural traditions. This tour takes you on a journey through the enigmatic sites and unique cultures of this mystical region. We visit the truly astounding sites of Khiva and central Asia’s holiest city, Bukhara and of course take in the spectacular architecture of Samarkand’s Registan – one of the most stunning collections of architecture to be found anywhere. Stepping further afield we travel to Turkmenistan and the ancient capital of Konye-Urgench as well as the splendid site of Merv, and cross the border to Tajikistan with its stunning mountain scenery. This breathtaking region has often been at the centre of world history, its strategic routes fought over by Mongols, Russians, British and many more and its treasures long coveted by others. Those who travel here will understand why.

Fitness*** | Adventure**** | Culture**** | History***** | Wildlife*

Day 1 – Tashkent

Arrive in Tashkent and transfer to the hotel. Depending on your time of arrival, you may have time to explore the city. Overnight at Shodlik Palace or similar.

Tashkent
Uzbekistan’s capital displays its Silk Road heritage even today. An ancient city dating back 2000 years it is the largest in Central Asia and probably it’s most cosmopolitan. Although much of it has been rebuilt following an earthquake in the 1960s, its old quarters still retain their charm with narrow streets and 500 year old mosques, medressas and other religious buildings. Tashkent has always been a centre of commerce – with trading links established with Russia it became wealthy during the Middle Ages. In the middle of the 19th century it was a focus of rivalry between the Emir of Bukhara and the city of Khokand, to which Tashkent paid tribute, and seizing the opportunity to take advantage of the regional turmoil the Russian army was able to gain control of Tashkent, bringing it under the Tsar’s rule in a gradual process of imperial expansion throughout Central Asia. Tashkent became the capital of Russian Turkestan and attracted great number of immigrants – today there are sizeable Russian and Korean communities within the city.

Day 2 – Khiva

Fly to Urgench and transfer to Khiva (30km), a stunning city with a wealth of ancient monuments. We spend the afternoon exploring its sites, including its many mosques, medressas and mausoleums of former rulers. Overnight Malika Khiva Hotel or similar. (B)

Khiva
Khiva is one of the true highlights of this astounding region – its ancient monuments have been superbly preserved and its historic centre contains more than fifty of them, along with around 250 old houses dating back to the 18th and 19th centuries. The inner town, or Ichon Qala, is encircled by 18th century mud walls and holds the cream of Khiva’s sites, a collection of remarkable palaces, mosques and mausoleums capped with bright blue domes and bedecked with stunning decoration. Minarets poke into the sky while its graceful archways betray links with Moghul India, and it is easy to visualise what this city once looked like when it was one of the most important in the region. Khiva was once an independent khanate renowned as a centre of the slave trade – raiders from Khiva would set off to vulnerable communities bringing back slaves to live in tortuous conditions or be sold to end up somewhere else along the Silk Road. Peter the Great first sought to bring Khiva under his control in 1717, but it was not to be – Russian forces were tricked and then massacred, humiliating the Tsar. In following years a number of attempts were made to free Russian slaves and take Khiva but it was not until 1873 that it fell.

Day 3 – Khiva

Continue our exploration of this marvellous city, listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Later there will be time for you to explore on your own. Overnight Malika Khiva Hotel or similar. (B)

Day 4 – Konye-Urgench - Ashgabat

We cross the border into little known Turkmenistan and head for the site of Konye-Urgench, an ancient capital of the land of Khorezm with beautiful mausoleums (240km). After visiting its key sites we fly to Turkmenistan’s capital, Ashgabat. Overnight Ak Altyn Hotel or similar. (B)

Konye-Urgench
Konye-Urgench was the capital of the ancient land of Khorezm in the 10th century, but has not had the easiest time since then. Falling first to the Seljuks and then falling under the control of their successors the Khorezmshahs, it enjoyed a brief period as the centre of Islamic Central Asia, replete with numerous beautiful mosques and medressas. This was not to last long however. In 1221 it was attacked by the armies of Genghis Khan, who besieged the city for six months before destroying it, leaving little but ashes and bodies. ‘Konye-Urgench became the abode of the jackal and the haunt of the owl and the kite’, wrote one local historian. Having rebuilt itself it was then sacked by Timur (Tamerlane), adding to its woes. Fortunately, a few architectural monuments survived this tragedy, notably the impressive mausoleums of former sultans as well as arched gates and fortresses which stand as testament to the former glories of this remote corner of Asia.

Day 5 – Ashgabat - Mary

Spend the morning exploring the sites of Ashgabat, a modern city that has been the focus of extensive and some would say eccentric building projects. We then fly to Mary, an oasis town close to the ancient city of Merv. Overnight Margush Hotel or similar. (B)

Ashgabat
Ashgabat was a fairly insignificant town before the arrival of the Russians, who chose it as an administrative centre and began to develop it in the late 19th century. In 1948 it was hit by a powerful earthquake which all but destroyed the city, and the city had to be completely rebuilt. Although reconstruction occurred during the Soviet era, it is Ashgabat’s development since independence in 1991 which has given the city its very unusual character. A pet project of the then dictator Niyazov, Ashgabat was the focus of his ‘nation building’ efforts and as such is home to a bewildering array of monuments, most of them faced with white marble tiles that give the city an almost glittering effect. There are few cities in the world that are so linked to one man, and Ashgabat is a striking and unusual place, at odds with other Central Asian cities but fascinating in its own right.

Day 6 – Merv - Bukhara

This morning we visit the ancient site of Merv, the most important in Turkmenistan and dating back 2500 years with an array of old mosques, citadels and Buddhist stupas. After exploring Merv we cross the border back into Uzbekistan and head to Bukhara (350km), Central Asia’s holiest city. Overnight Caravan Hotel or similar. (B)

Merv
The site of Merv spreads over one hundred square kilometres and holds the remains of a number of ancient cities spread over centuries. At various times it has been home to Zoroastrians, Buddhists, Christians and Moslems and has been controlled by a number of dynasties including the Timurids. Merv’s attractions are wide and varied – mausoleums of former rulers and Sufi scholars, old Seleucid citadels, traditional ‘ice houses’ and the remains of ancient walls. Merv was comprehensively sacked by the Mongols in the 13th century but rose to prominence again under the Timurids two hundred years later. With so many influences, Merv is a microcosm of Central Asian history and a delight to explore.

Day 7 – Bukhara

We spend today exploring Bukhara, one of the most spectacular cities in the region and with a superbly preserved old quarter. Overnight Caravan Hotel or similar. (B)

Bukhara
Mighty Bukhara is renowned as the holiest of Central Asia’s cities and is said to have been in existence when Alexander the Great passed through the region, more than two thousand years ago. Its old centre is exceptionally well preserved and contains old medressas and mosques, ancient minarets and protected buildings dating back as far as the 10th century. The independent khanate of Bukhara was one of the focal points of the ‘Great Game’ – a period of imperial rivalry between Britain and Russia in the 18th and 19th centuries that saw each seek to expand their influence. The British sent Alexander Burnes to the city in 1832 in an attempt to bring the city into their sphere of influence, but this was inconclusive and although Burnes was treated well, later emissaries were to fare far worse – two English officers were kept captive there for some time before eventually being executed in Bukhara’s Registan square.

Day 8 – Gijduvan - Samarkand

Drive to the legendary city of Samarkand (300km) stopping en route at Gijduvan, locally renowned as a centre for ceramics. Upon arrival in Samarkand we start to explore. Overnight Malika Hotel or similar. (B)

Day 9 – Samarkand

A full day exploring glorious Samarkand with its spectacular collection of traditional buildings. Samarkand is most famous for its Registan Square, which contains perhaps the most stunning and well preserved architecture in the whole region. Long held in awe by early western travellers, it is easy to lose yourself in wonder at the incredible mosques and medressas, elaborately decorated in blue tiles and traditional Islamic art. Overnight at Malika Hotel or similar. (B)

Samarkand
Samarkand is perhaps the most atmospheric of all of Uzbekistan’s and indeed the whole region’s cities, a glorious collection of immaculately preserved monuments that reach their climax in the superb Registan square, renowned as the finest architectural ensemble in Central Asia. Founded in the 8th century BC by the Persians, Samarkand has always been an important centre for the various forces passing through and has at times been controlled by Arabs, Sogdians and the armies of Alexander the Great. It was Timur who left the greatest mark on the city, designating it as his capital and embarking on a program of building that was continued after his death to produce one of the most startling sights in Asia. Vivid blue capped minarets jostle for space with tiled medressas, enormous arched gateways decorated with Islamic art and numerous mosques and mausoleums of the great and the good, as well as a marvellous observatory built by the ruler and astronomer Ulug Beg. Samarkand takes your breath away – there is no other place like it.

Day 10 – Termez

A long day of driving will bring us to Termez on the border with Afghanistan (450km). On arrival we will visit the Termez Archaeological Museum to gain an insight into the particular history of the city Overnight Meridien Hotel or similar. (B)

Termez
Perched on the border with Afghanistan, Termez is unusual in that it contains the only evidence of past Buddhist civilisation in Uzbekistan, with some old monasteries and a Buddhist stupa that date back to between the 1st and 3rd centuries still remaining today. In the 7th century the city was conquered by Arab forces and became a major centre of Islam. In the 13th century Genghis Khan stormed through here and razed much of the city to dust, but was rebuilt under the Timurids. Its position meant that it had a particular strategic significance when it was under Russian control, and it was one of the further outposts of the Russian and Soviet empires.

Day 11 – Dushanbe

After breakfast we will view the ironically named “Friendship Bridge”, before visiting the 15th century mausoleum of al Hakkim al Termezi, the Sufi leader known as Termez Ota or the Father of Termez City. From there we cross the border into Tajikistan and drive to Dushanbe (270km), the capital. On arrival we explore Dushanbe’s sites and soak up the atmosphere of this little visited Central Asian city. Overnight Hotel Gulistan or similar. (B)

Dushanbe
Dushanbe is a relatively modern town that rose to prominence during the Soviet era, when it was made the capital of the Tajik Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic and named Stalinabad. Its name means ‘Monday in the Tajik language, arising from the fact that this was the day that the market was held when Dushanbe was still a small and fairly insignificant village. The ousted Emir of Bukhara, fleeing from the Bolsheviks, stayed in Dushanbe and cooperated with Enver Pasha’s Basmachis until he had to leave the region. From Dushanbe, he fled to Afghanistan in 1921, the year the town was freed from the Basmachis as well.

Day 12 – Iskander Kul

Drive through stunning scenery to Lake Iskander Kul in the Fann Mountains (150km), where we have opportunities to hike around the lake shore. We have the rest of the day to explore the area and can visit nearby waterfalls and springs as well as small settlements. Overnight tourist cottages. (BLD)

Day 13 – Istravshan

After breakfast drive to Istravshan (165km), along the Fon-Dariye River and over the Shahristan pass. Upon arrival in Istravshan we will visit Mugh teppa, Kok-Gumbaz and Chor-Gumbaz mosque and local bazaar Overnight Hotel Sadbarg or similar. (BLD)

Day 14 – Tashkent

Cross the border back to Uzbekistan and head to Tashkent (265km) for our final night. Overnight Shodlik Palace or similar. (B)

Day 15 – Tashkent

Tour ends with a transfer to the airport. (B)

Kontakt os for priser og datoer eller et tilbud på en individuel rejse til Tadsjikistan asien@happylamatravel.com

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